Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Nina's Newbery

Nina Lindsay has just announced the results of her mock Newbery discussion, and the winner is Criss Cross, by Lynne Rae Perkins. Honor books (and do let's someday have a discussion as to exactly why Newbery [or Caldecott] Honor Books cannot, upon pain of banishment from all that is good and holy in the realm of the dragon ladies, be called runners-up) are Susan Campbell Bartoletti's Hitler Youth, Marilyn Nelson's A Wreath for Emmett Till, Elizabeth Partridge's John Lennon, and Jacqueline Woodson's Show Way.

7 comments:

shewhousuallydoesn'tdothistypeofthing said...

Yes, and let's do by all means, from now on, include a swimsuit competition.

Nina said...

Well, the Honor Books are "also truly distinguished," under the definitions of the award, so I imagine it would hurt their feelings to be called runners-up. They used to be called that--maybe too many suits? (That's lawsuits, not swimsuits. Of which competition John Lennon and Show Way would have been neck and neck--definetely sexy looking books.)

Nina

Anonymous said...

Aww, who cares about the Newbery. Tell us what's going to win the Scott O'Dell this year, Roger.

Roger Sutton said...

I don't know if I'm actually allowed to say this yet, but let's just see who reads this blog. The Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction, judged by Hazel Rochman, Ann D. Carlson, and me (all fast friends of the late Zena Sutherland, who set up the award with O'Dell and was chair of the jury until her death) goes this year to Louise Erdrich's The Game of Silence, published by HarperCollins. The award carries with it a $5000 prize. I know that Hazel has told Erdrich (who is thrilled) but I don't know who else knows, besides you all.

AMP said...

More people than you think read this blog!

Monica Edinger said...

As you know, I do (read roger usually at ungodly hours) and applaud the Scott O'Dell decision. While I remember liking The Birchbark House I don't remember it being as profound as The Game of Silence. That is, what blew me away with The Game of Silence is that title theme which stays just below the surface throughout much of the novel, arising at moments for great effect, massively at the end. A fantastic work of historical fiction (and just a great novel) and so I'm delighted. Congratulations to the committee for making such a great choice and, of course, to Louise Erdich.

Monica

Lisa Yee said...

I want to ask Nina Lindsay what numbers I should pick for the lottery!